This is no shrinking violet!

Belle Glos Pinot Noir are wines made for Cabernet lovers.  While each of the three vineyards used to make these wines is coastal, they all produce very different wines.  The Wagner family is well known for their contributions to thee wine industry in Napa, through their efforts at Caymus Vineyards.  Going back to the 1800s, the family has deep California roots.

The family has been making wine in California since 1972, when Caymus was founded.  Now, while the family seat is at Caymus in Napa, the additions of Mer Soleil Chardonnay, run by son Charlie Wagner, Belle Glos run by son Joseph Wagner, and Conundrum, a blend mastered by longtime employee, and new places for daughters Jenny and Erin to learn the business, the family of wine has grown.

There is a history of experimentation and creativity, which led Belle Glos to break the traditional mold of California Pinot Noir.  Joseph’s passion for farming and viticulture is well known.  His early experiences with this Italian Grandmother helps guide his future as he expanding the success of the Belle Glos line, that he has managed since 2002.  Belle Glos, featuring single-vineyard Pinot Noirs from Sonoma, Monterey, and Santa Barbara counties was named for Joseph’s grandmother, he has selected three of the coolest growing regions for the Pinot Noir.  farmed in small lots, the grapes are left to hang longer than normal, to create intense and complex flavors.  In this manner, they are creating bold, flavor packed Pinots that are setting Belle Glos apart from more traditional styles.

There are three single vineyard Pinots from Belle Glos:  Clark & Telephone, Taylor Lane and Las Alturas.  Each one is slightly different, but all three are made in a big, bold style.  A Pinot meant for a Cabernet lover!

Clark & Telephone Vineyard is located in the Santa Maria Valley, which is cooled by the wind and fog blowing in from the Pacific Ocean along the Santa Maria River inland.  Planted on its own roostock, the vineyard is planted to 100% Martini clone, something that is rarely seen today.  This wine was a mix of sweet ripe red fruit and spicy notes, with a nice acid balance.  It was my favorite of the three, and had a lot of cinnamon, baking spice, and ripe blackberry notes.

The Taylor Lane Vineyard Pinot from the Sonoma Coast, is less than 6 miles from the ocean.  Known for the heavy fog, it’s a particularly good place for classic Pinot due to the cool climate, but harder if you are trying to ripen the fruti for a stylistic change.  The Dijon clones in this vineyard held a lot of cedar and cola, with Bing cherries and a hefty 60% new French oak treatment.  This would have been my pick but because of the oak it was just too overblown for me.

Finally, the Las Alturas Vineyard in the Santa Lucia Highlands.  Located in a world famous Pinot Noir growing region in the Central Coast area, each slope of the vineyard was planted in a different clone.  This dense, dark and chewy wine had a lot of earthy notes, tons of vanilla, and cherry pie filling.  The key note was a slightly artificial hint, in that canned filling that we all know (and don’t always love).

ALl in all, these were interesting wines; however, they were, to me, over extracted and manipulated.  I prefer a less extracted, less oaked, more subtle wine.  These are solid, well made wines that are in a bigger style.  I think that the Santa Maria would be a great entree in to the world of Pinot for someone who is used to the larger fruit profile of a Napa Cab or a Sonoima Zinfandel.  If you enjoy a big, bold, dynamic and cherry driven Pinot Noir, check these out.  They might surprise you!

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Wagner Familiy, with Grandma in the center

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