Rewinery gets a relaunch

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We all know about the food delivery services, places like Seamless, GrubHub and Foodler.  But did you know about the local wine delivery service? Rewinery, the San Francisco based wine delivery service, has been around for about a year.  While they have had some growing pains, and have had a few not so successful iterations (in my humble opinion), I am pleased to report that the latest move has proven successful, and delicious! Initially conceived as a wine lovers Kozmo, the now defunct dot commie’s “I’ll delivery anything for a price” service, Rewinery has had premium wines, private label wines, and picnic baskets among its offers.  Now settling in to sophomore year, they have refined the offerings to be something for everything. Filling a much needed sweet spot for corporate parties and gifts, Rewinery also provides great deals on some great wines for people that just need an extra few bottles for their party, or can’t get to the local wine shop.  Today, for example, one of the featured wines is a personal fave – La Posta Cocina Tinto.  This delicious red blend from Argentina is offered at a mere $15; with a $5 delivery fee, you can have a great wine for your evening sipping in no time! This is no Two Buck Chuck delivery service!  Initially, I’ll admit, I as a bit disappointed the offerings.  There were low to mid market wines, that, frankly, weren’t worth the bike ride to delivery them.  Now, however, much like some of the flash sale sites, Rewinery is able to offer different wines on a frequent basis, with at least 3-4 red and white bottles to choose from.  Making good wines accessible is Rewinery’s goal.  They bring great wines to consumers at amazing prices and makes wine discovery fun, not intimidating or frustrating.  Located in downtown San Francisco, they are able to deliver wine within the city limits in under an hour. With the variety of wine being offered, and the ability to get it on a whim – and even to time it with your pizza delivery, check out Rewinery today! If you’d like to check it out for youself, click HERE (affilliate link) Ordering credit was given for editorial consideration; however, I will happily spend my own money (and often do) on some of these tasty treats!  Thirsty Thursday anyone?

The missing link

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When I first saw that Marcy Gordon had tagged me in her 7 links project, I was a bit trepedatious.  How would I ever live up to this lofty goal?  how would i pick posts that were meaningful, amusing, and that you wanted to read?  Acccck! As you may or may not have noticed, this year my blogging has fallen off a cliff and I struggle with both inspiration and motivation to keep on the wagon.  some days are better than others.  So actually, now that I reflect on it more, I’m really fortunate that Marcy tagged me – because it gives me a built in blog post!  Beyond that, I do believe it’s time to pull out my Creative Whack Pack for some new ideas. Now, back to my 7 Links.  This project asks bloggers to select seven lnks (posts) from blog posts past that exemplify certain categories.  Once i pick my 7 posts, then I get to take 5 bloggers.  Though personally I think I am going to tag 7 bloggers since, well, it’s 7 Links! And the nominees are — Most beautiful post:   How does one define beauty?  It is beautiful writing, or is is beautiful pictures?  That’s an interesting one to choose.   When I think about it, this post is my most beautiful meal, with the wine and food pairings at Artisan, Paso Robles.   Most popular post:   According to Google Analytics, in my blog’s nearly five year history, my most popular post was about my local wine bar, Barrique.   Most controversial post:   Are you certifiable?  Why wine bloggers should (or should not) be “certified”.   Most helpful post:   Google+ through a wine bloggers eyes   Post whose success was most surprising: One bad experience a firestorm does create:  Hospitalit-eed Off   Post that maybe didn’t get the attention it deserved: Why are RSS feeds such a pain?   Post most proud of: There are actually two that are really in a tie for me, and they both cover a similar topic.  I am passionate on how blogging matters and what it means in the larger scope of things so, feast your ears on this: It just DOES matter! Where is the ever blurring line between bloggers and traditional media?   As I looked back on my blog posts, I see a clear theme; the things that matter to me, that inspire me to spout poetic, are the things that you are talking about.  What is a blogger?  Why do you blog?  What is the most controversial wine right now?  And then, there is always bacon.  I think I might need to bring back my Bacon Fridays theme – where I make one recipe with bacon and pair it with wine – on Fridays (or perhaps Sundays). What do YOU want to hear from me?   Inquiring minds want to know! So I now nominate 7 bloggers (and yes, they are all women, because I think we need to support each other more) who I admire and enjoy reading: Liza Swift – Brix Chicks […]

To trade or not to trade, THAT is the question.

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Spring, wonderous spring.  The rain has left for now, and the wine festivals are upon us.  Or are they? Recently, I found that Pinot Days, the San Francisco varietal focused event held at the end of June, will not be offering any trade tickets to this years event.  Huh?  No trade tickets?  To ANYone? While I understand that the definition of “trade” has become blurred recently with bloggers, media, and other supposedly credentialed folks clamoring to take part in free wine, I really think that Pinot Days is missing the boat here. First, the “Trade Requirements” link takes you to a page that says yo must be a legitimate member of one of the following categories: Wine Retail Owner or Buyer Restaurateur Sommelier Wine Distributor Wine Buyer Wine Broker Ok, great.  That makes sense.  But when you click on Request Trade Tickets, you are rudely informed that San Francisco will not be offering trade tickets at all.  To restrict trade tickets to a select few individuals does make economical and logistical sense.  This is what Rhone Rangers has started to do, by reviewing each trade request carefully, and making a determination of trade eligibility.  Fair enough.  If I qualify, i get notified.  If i don’t, I make the decision to pay or not pay to attend with the rest of the public.  Understandably, the costs and time required to verify legitimate trade members may be more than the actual cost of the ticket, which presents a good reason for not taking the time to review every site individually. Now I appreciate the fact that some of these events have gotten out of control, and every Tom, Dick or Harry, attempts to pass themselves off as trade.  However, to eliminate the attendance of restaurants, wine retailers, and traditional media Representatives entirely is to put a big DO NOT ENTER sign on your front door.  As a blogger, I am keenly aware that word of mouth is the most powerful marketing tool there is.  See my collective rant about Domaine Chandon’s lack of service recently.  If I am not exposed to things to talk about, then I guess I won’t be talking about them at all.  My focus will be shifted to those wineries I will be visiting at Barrel Tasting this weekend and next, because they WANT me to visit.  They practically begged me to visit. Yes, many of the wineries pouring at these events have an elitist attitude and feel that they don’t have to “sell” their wines to the trade.  We should know who they are obviously.  Clearly, I should be printing the pour list out and running to my local wine shop requesting each and every wine to be stocked.  Obviously, I am a little befuddled at that thought process, since this is one of the few single varietal tasting events, and it allows me to explore new areas, new wineries, and new tastes in Pinot which I can then review.  Furthermore, I can network with retailers and […]