Von Winning – Winning wines from Pfalz

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  This sample was provided by Wines of Germany for consideration. There is something magical in the wines of Germany.  From pinot blanc, to the hidden gems of pinot noir, there is something for everyone.  This rich white, from the Pfalz region of Germany, is from a compact yet importnat area meandering through some of the most fertile land in the area.  One of Germany’s largest and most important wine producing regions, it sits between the Rhine and the Haadt mountains in a compact 45 long by 15 miles wide. While only 40% of the wines from this region are red, pinot noir is becoming increasingly more important here.  Generally known for it’s table wine products (Landwin and Deutscher Wein), but the increase in pinot noir has made it a very popular region.  Given it’s proximity to Alsace, the varietals planted and the culture is very similar.  Pfalz has a warmer, dry climate, which gives rise to a richer, more concentrated wine style then it’s neighbors.  Additionally, the vineyards are clusted at hte base of the Weingut von Winning was founded in 1849 and is planted to 158 acres, focused on riesling.  They also product sevearl other varieties, and The Von Winning Weissburgunder II is a delicious oaky rendition of pinot blanc.  The pale gold color looks like it would be sprightly, but the rich peach and stone fruit shows off a touch of salinity at the finish.  Mouthwatering spice notes from the oak make me want to go back for more.  This would be a lovely wine with your holiday ham, or for those red wine drinkers who prefer a richer white. $30  

Winesense, nonsense, Riesling sense!

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When I was studying for my Certified Specialist of Wine credential, one of the most challenging regions for me was Germany.  Not because of the wines specifically, as while there are some unusual varietals, most German wines are fairly well known, but for the simple reason that deciphering a German wine labels is an exercise in linguistics, frustration, and a pyramid that  would make Giza look simple. The Rise of Riesling One of the most classic German wines is Riesling.  Riesling is one of the most complex, diverse, and wondrous wines in the world, and I often want to say “taste the rainbow” when I think of Riesling.   From bone dry, to sticky sweet, oily and petrol driven, to chalk and shale, Riesling is produced in a wide variety of styles.  Understanding how to find the specific style you are looking for is part of the mystery and fascination of German wine.   Cracking the Code Varietal The grape variety is clearly marked, so that’s easy.  We have Riesling Must Weight Next, to determine the level of ripeness – or more technically the must weight of the harvested grapes (which really does not have any impact no sweetness of the finished wine), we look at the Prädikat level.  For example, a Riesling picked at it’s fullest potential ripeness, or just a hare’s breath past late harvest, is known as Spätlese.  If you’re looking for something that is picked below full ripeness, go for a Kabinett.  For the sweet sticky beauty of a dessert wine, you want a wine that is at least Auslese, which is late harvest, but true stickies are Beerenauslese or Trokenbeerenauslese.  Confusingly, Troken is also the word for “dry”. For this wine, it’s marked Spätlese, next to Riesling. Are you with me? How Sweet It Is Here we get to the tricky part.  Since you need to determine the level of sweetness separately from the must weight, you need to classify the taste of the sugar content, using Troken (dry) or Feinherb (off-dry). This wine is dry, or Trocken. The relatively new Riesling Scale can help us Americans with these things.  While some people disparage the International Riesling Foundation’s dumbing down of Riesling, at a simple level, it’s helpful. That said, remember that Riesling is a high acid grape.  Acid balances sweetness, so that even a Medium Sweet Riesling may not play that tune when you are drinking it with maple smoked salmon. Are You A Good Witch, or a Bad Witch? Now that we understand what the flavor profile might be in the glass, we need to look at where it is from.  The Qualitätswein (QbA) and Prädikatswein (QmP) designations denote quality wine and quality wine from a specific region, and table wine (Taflewein) and bulk wine (Landwein) are the lower brow everyday wines. This wine is Prädikatswein, a quality wine from a specific region The Mosel Right.  So really, there are many layers of classification but once you understand the basis for categorization, you can generally interpret what to expect from the wine. […]