Live Blogging: Taken Wine Co Red Wine

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Taken Wine Company is based in Napa and has 3 blends. This one is Taken Napa Valley Red Wine, a Bordeaux style blend, made from Cab and Merlot. This is a rich cab based wine, with deep purple fruit, blackberry, and smokey dried blueberry. The budget friendly $30 makes this an everyday enjoyable wine from Josh Phelps, who is part of the Phelps family.

Live Blogging: J Vineyards PInot Gris

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J Vineyards is a women owned and operated winery in the Russian River area of Sonoma, specializing in sparkling wine but also Pinot Gris and Pinot noir. The 2013 Gris is stainless steel fermented, with no malo, and is sourced from all over the state of California.  Retailing for $14, this is a wonderful example of the grape, that is expressive and unique.  Pears, Asian pear, Meyer lemon, grilled pineapple and savory spices all blend together to create a wonderfully creamy full bodied white.

Lessons on being a better blogger…writer…or whatever

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Wine:  The final frontier These are the voyages of the Wine Brat, Thea. Its 5 year mission (yep, it’s true.  I’ve been blogging for five years!) To explore strange new wines To seek out new bottles and new producers To boldly go where no wine blogger has gone before. These are the voyages of a wine bloggers writer and lover, trying to discover more about herself and her passion for the grape. Recently back from a weekend in Virginia at the Wine Bloggers Conference, where both New York Times wine critfc Eric Asimov and London Financial Times wine writer Jancis Robinson gave a key note speeches, my thoughts are jumbled and varied as I think about how to be a better blogger. Both Jancis Robinson and Eric Asimov challenge the word, and somewhat the concept – of blogger.  Is "blogger" still really a valid term?  Bloggers are wine writers who chose to publish on line.  Traditional print media authors choose to publish on paper.  Writing is what brings us all together, today.  Love, true love (of the vine).  I am still getting used to this idea.  I am a proud blogger and I like to refer to myself that way, because if I call myself a wine writer, the mass public naturally assumes that I write for a publication.  Perhaps we should be called "online wine writers". As wine writers, Jancis challenged us to do more investigative research before we blog.  Er write.  While the core value of this makes sense, I question the validity of her challenge; I am not a journalist, nor do i wish to be one.  While the most successful wine bloggers (not in terms of making money but in readership) have similar core writing styles, none of them assume or claim to be journalists.  Nor do I.  I try to be accurate and truthful in my writing, but in the end – my blog is just my blog, and musings of what I feel like talking about.  one of the major reasons that I decided not to pursue writing with an online wine magazine was because I didn’t want to be subject to the editorial rules that come with being a professional writer.  I write this blog so I can express my  thoughts in a meaningful way, and I hope that you enjoy reading it, and share with others. One vital point that Jancis made during her speech was that writers, print or otherwise, need to sit up and take notice that while the book is not dead, the delivery method of the written word is changing.  Online, kindle, ebook readers, print, newspapers, magazine.  Essentially, they are all the same thing – but the delivery method is different.  I have an ipad, but most of my books are just that – books.  That said, the Kindle / iPad / Nook market allows you to give readers the option of how they will choose to accept delivery of your material.  I read blogs primary via an RSS reader.  Some people read […]